Let's talk briefly about how insanely cool Stranger Things is. It's a glorious depiction of everything that 30- something's watched and lived in the 80's and it comes at a time when we're ready to feast on nostalgia, like the demogorgon did on Barb (#justiceforbarb). It either sparked the 80's pop culture revival or it's fanned the flames of one that was always still there a little bit. It's made 90's and 00's kids care about synthesisers, rainbow- sleeved puffer bomber jackets and awkward haircuts.

Visually... it's an absolute treat. It's a perfect example of why you should give a damn about the smallest of details because they will have an effect on the overall integrity of a project. It's that attention to detail that makes Stranger Things such an engaging setting for the story. Any art direction should be done at 3000% magnification because I'm a firm believer that it's those small details that effect the perceived quality of a piece of design and make the difference between it looking like an item of quality or a cheap attempt. In our context, this might be zooming way into the logo we're designing to make sure that vector points line up perfectly and therefore make the logo look smoother or more balanced. Attention to lots of small details add up to a big impact... but I'm not specifically trying to tie how good Stranger Things is to how design should be approached.

This post has come about from reading how much money Netflix spend on creating their content and then promoting it. Any business-head cringes at their figures; they're over $20billion in debt, but they don't seem to be too worried. I'm not a market analyst, but I am a visual analyst. They are content creators and creatives just like we are. They know that they need to create quality output and they need to double down on it with an uncompromising attitude in order to achieve long term success. This year they are planning on spending a further $8billion on new content, but that's not the interesting part... it's the additional $2billion that they will spend to market that content. You're maybe recoiling in horror at the thought of going even further in debt and you wouldn't be criticised for thinking to tell them to stop, but Netflix know that they create great quality content and they know that they need to spend the money letting people know about it.

We've seen great businesses who have great ideas fail to get off the launch pad because they didn't market. It's fear that causes it but that's not a criticism... any sane person would be afraid when looking at their figures and counting their debt or remaining budget. However, if you've created a great product or business that you believe in, and it may have cost you a fortune to do that, it's never going to make you any money if people don't know about it. Don't be stupid with your money but also don't fail to appreciate how vitally important it is to make sure you are presented, packaged and promoted properly.

Don’t approach design with what money you have left but give it the due importance and consideration it deserves right from the very beginning of and project.